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Friday, October 16, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations found in the catalog.

The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations

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  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Liturgy Training Publications .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biblical Studies - General,
  • Bible - Study - General,
  • Religion,
  • Religion - Biblical Studies

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsDavid Philippart (Editor), Julie Lonneman (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages31
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12189874M
    ISBN 101568544340
    ISBN 109781568544342

    In A Walk in Jerusalem, The Rev. Canon John L. Peterson, Secretary General of the Anglican Communion, brings new life to this centuries-old ritual known as the Stations of the Cross. Illustrated with a map, 14 black-and-white photographs, and 14 pen-and-ink drawings, this helpful guide provides the appropriate episode of the Passion story along. The Stations of the Cross (Way of the Cross, Via Crucis, Via Dolorosa, Way of Sorrows) is a traditional way to consider the last hours of Jesus' life. The devotional practice is said to have begun with St. Francis of Assisi and extended throughout the Roman Catholic Church during the .

    The pictures of the Stations of the Cross taken from Church of the Holy Trinity, Gainesville, Virginia by TimeLine Media, Printed in Canada Stations 2 2/4/ PM. The following stations of the cross are based on those celebrated by Pope John Paul II on Good Friday They are presented here as an alternative to the traditional stations and as a way of reflecting more deeply on the Scriptural accounts of Christ's passion. The presiding minister may be a priest, deacon, or layperson.

    Stations of the Cross Coloring Book Artwork by Father Marko Rupnik, S.J. and the artists of Centro Aletti Artwork by Father Marko Rupnik, S.J. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem. Jesus falls for the third time. Jesus is stripped of his clothes. Jesus is nailed to the cross. Jesus dies on the cross.   By the fifteenth century outdoor shrines were built throughout Europe to imitate the locations in Jerusalem. Each shrine, or station, represented a Scriptural or traditional scene from Good Friday events. By the mids, the Stations of the Cross were allowed in churches. Originally, the number of stations varied from five to twenty.


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The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations Download PDF EPUB FB2

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This traditional version of the 14 Stations of the Cross recounts the moments leading up to Jesus crucifixion in the way familiar to most Roman Catholics. Designed for use with the Leader s Book for communal celebration or on its own.

The Way of the Cross: Traditional and Modern Meditations The Way of the Cross leads us to contemplate the Passion of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, to consider His great love for us, His humility, and the glory of the perfect offering He made in the work of our redemption.

The Way of the Cross, as a devotion, has its origin in the faithful’s retracing of Christ’s steps in the City of. The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations: Philippart, David, Lonneman, Julie: Books - at: Paperback. Buy The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations by David Philippart (Editor), Julie Lonneman (Illustrator) online at Alibris.

We have new and used copies available, in 1 editions - starting at $ Shop now. The Way of The Cross - Station 1 First station of the cross – Via Dolorosa - Jesus Trial.

Jesus is brought to trial in front of the Roman Perfect, Pontius Pilates at. Christian pilgrims who take part in the "Via Dolorosa" ("Way of the Cross") in Jerusalem follow a route of 14 stations that have been used since the time of the Crusades.

Members of the Order of St. Francis, the religious community that oversees custody of the Christian sites in the Holy Land, lead the stations of the cross every Friday afternoon along the Via Dolorosa.

The Via Dolorosa - The Way of the Cross is a winding path through the ancient Old City of Jerusalem tracing the route that Our Lord carried His Cross on His way to be crucified on Calvary. This is a awe-inspiring and inspirational journey that any Pilgrim to the Holy Land must take.

2, years of development along the Via Dolorosa has /5(K). 14 stations way of the Cross – Via Dolorosa Jerusalem Published Ap | By admin The Via Dolorosa (“Via Della Rosa”) also known as Jesus Way of the Cross and 14 stations of the Cross rout is one of the most important and meaningful Holy Land attractions to.

The devotion consists of meditating on 14 events which form the 14 stations of the cross. The purpose of this devotion is to focus on the Passion of Jesus Christ. Here is the long version of “Stations of the Cross” or “Way of the Cross” with meditations and prayers.

The Way of the Cross passes though the Muslim and Christian Quarters of Jerusalem and ends at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre where Catholics and Eastern Orthodox believe is the site of the Calvary, the tomb of Jesus and from whence Jesus has resurrected.

The Way of The Cross - Station 1. Station Of The Cross (Way Of The Cross) This devotion arose in Jerusalem during the Middle Ages when pilgrims retraced the steps of the ” Via Dolorosa, " the distance from the Praetorium, where Jesus was condemned, to Calvary, where he was crucified.

The Stations of the Cross or the Way of the Cross, also known as the Way of Sorrows or the Via Crucis, refers to a series of images depicting Jesus Christ on the day of his crucifixion and accompanying stations grew out of imitations of Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem which is believed to be the actual path Jesus walked to Mount object of the stations is to help the Christian.

Compared with the traditional text, the biblical Way of the Cross celebrated by the Holy Father at the Colosseum for the first time in presented certain variants in the «subjects» of the stations.

In the light of history, these variants, rather than new, are - if anything - simply rediscovered. There is also a brief history of the Way of the Cross devotion, which began in Jerusalem.

Each station includes a Scripture verse, a brief text to help children imagine the scene, a four-color illustration, and a prayer. This lovely book can Reviews: 4. A book entitled "Jerusalem sicut Christi tempore floruit", written by one Adrichomius and published ingives twelve Stations which correspond exactly with the first twelve of ours, and this fact is thought by some to point conclusively to the origin of the particular selection afterwards authorized by the Church, especially as this book had a wide circulation and was translated into several European languages.

Station 1 Via Dolorosa Jerusalem. Station I With my guide book in hand, I left the hotel and walked the short way to the Old City and the entrance to the Lions’ Gate, the starting point of the Via Dolorosa. Walking through the gate, the first station is a few yards ahead at the present day Umariya Elementary School.

Each station is marked. For the erection of the Way of the Cross fourteen crosses are required, to which it is customary to add fourteen pictures or images, which represent the stations of Jerusalem.

According to the more common practice, the pious exercise consists of fourteen pious readings, to which some vocal prayers are added.

STATIONS OF THE CROSS FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE AND RECONCILIATION The Stations of the Cross (also called the Way of the Cross) is a traditional liturgical devotion commemorating the last day of Jesus’ life.

The devotion originated with pilgrims in Jerusalem retracing the traditional steps Jesus is believed to have followed on Good Friday. Since not all. The Way of the Cross Traditional Jerusalem Stations by David Philippart (Editor), Julie Lonneman (Illustrator).

Liturgy Training Pubns, Paperback. Used:Good. Every Friday in Jerusalem, Franciscan monks take groups of pilgrims down the Via Dolorosa, the road Christ may have walked on his way to the cross.

Stopping at each of fourteen locations that mark events in the final days of Christ’s life, the pilgrims recall the Passion story and offer prayers for the world/5(1). Stations of the Cross. by. St. Francis of Assisi. Nihil Obstat Rt. Rev. Msgr. Malachy P.

Foley, Censor Deputatus. Imprimatur + Albert Cardinal Meyer, Archbishop of Chicago. Kneeling before the altar, make an Act of Contrition, and form the intention of gaining the indulgences, whether for yourself or for the souls in Purgatory.The Stations of the Cross are 14 points along the Way of the Cross in the Old City leading from the Church of the Flagellation to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Each Station is marked with a picture, sculpture or etching into the walls of the Old City along the route commemorating the following events that occurred during Jesus’s path to.The Stations of the Cross have formed part of Christian devotion at Passiontide for many centuries because they enable us to engage actively with the path of suffering walked by Jesus.

They originated when early Christians visited Jerusalem and wanted to follow literally in the footsteps of Jesus, tracing the path from Pilate’s house to Calvary.